Another Exynos with its own Samsung cores

Every next generation of mobile devices offers its users more power, and comes primarily from mainstream processors. Many smartphone manufacturers buy them from external vendors, but some rely on their own hardware. This is what Samsung is doing, which is planning further work on the development of Exynos chips.

The resignation of the installation of the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge Snapdragon 810 processor went out to Samsung for good. His own Exynos 7420, which was on board the new flagship of the Korean concern, proved to be the most efficient chip on the market, leaving rivals far behind.

But Samsung is not enough and, according to the latest reports, the next-generation 2.3 GHz Mongoose working system, instead of the standard Cortex-A72 cores, is going to be developed by its own engineers. They say they are very efficient when the rumors are that a test using one Geekbench benchmark has shown remarkable performance. The processor scored 2200 points, about 45 percent more than the current chip.

But before we start to get excited about the forthcoming arrangement, I have to point out that all these rumors are just gossip. But if there is a grain of truth in it, then Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy S7 will receive new processors entirely manufactured by Samsung.

Uppleva! Here is a TV with IKEI

Although IKEA stores are mostly associated with furniture, you can find hundreds of other things, such as hot dogs that cost a penny. The company will soon expand its range of products with a completely new industry, this time closely related to the interior design. IKEA will start selling TVs, but very original, not available in any other store.

The product called “Uppleva” (meaning Swedish in “experience”) can be called both a piece of furniture and a TV. It is nothing but Smart TV integrated with a table that can be incorporated into the living room furniture.

The chest of drawers holds the Blu-ray player, but also provides room for a second device, such as a cable TV decoder or receiver. There are also two satellite speakers inside, and the subwoofer is a separate module and can be set anywhere. Because there is wireless, there will be no mess in the room. It should be noted that the Uppleva was created just to eliminate the tangle of cables surrounding almost any non-integrated home theater. In addition, all functions of the TV and Blu-ray player are handled with just one remote control.

The receiver itself will have a set of audio inputs and outputs, and allow you to connect various external devices. On the side panel there will be four HDMI ports, two USB, and an iPod connector. For wireless connectivity will be a Wi-Fi module, but also a traditional radio (FM) receiver.The display will have a Full HD resolution (1080p) and a size of at least 24 “. For now it is not known exactly what will be prepared, but it is certain that there will be several of them.

Apple lost the patent dispute

Apple loves to pull rivals in court to infringe its patents. But it also does not avoid using anyone else’s technology and sometimes has to answer for it. The American company has just lost the trial with the Swiss company Kudelski, whose unlawful patents have violated.

German court in Dusseldorf has found Apple to be in violation of patents owned by the Swiss company Kudelski, the owner of OpenTV platform, related to video streaming technology. He also ordered the continued use of the disputed patents that were used on iPhone, iPad and Apple TV.

The OpenTV platform is currently not the most recognizable brand, but at one time it was one of the first players in the video content streaming market. In 2010, OpenTV was purchased by the Kudelski Group, which in 2014 sued Apple for infringing its patents by filing a suit against Cupertino in US and German court cases.

Computer Processors with Trojan Horse?

According to the latest report, which is a joint effort of European and American specialists, CPUs used in computers can be equipped with a hardware Trojan horse. Already at the stage of their production, the design of the system can be changed to include the appropriate technology to facilitate the break-in of computers and the spying of users of such equipment. Worse yet, these changes would be virtually undetectable without the use of specialized equipment.

The above message should not be a big surprise. Five years ago, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have proven that it is possible. By adding a few additional items to the chip, they can spy on the user without hindrance.

Recent research in this field shows, however, that the proper fabrication of the system does not require the installation of any additional circuitry, as it can simply change the doping of some transistors.

This is a method to introduce impurities into the silicon to thereby change its electrical properties. By adjusting the doping of a small number of transistors you can modify the operation of the system to create a hardware spy directly in the processor. And since the changes were made at the atomic level, they can not be detected using standard IC quality verification methods.

You could write that the NSA would be happy to welcome new ways of spying on citizens, but I am surprised that they have known this for a long time, and perhaps even use this knowledge on a large scale. All the more, as I recently wrote, NSA can hack into virtually any computer, and so modified processor would make it much easier.